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Creative Contest: Who is the Greatest Limericist of All?


For March we are running a "Create a *CLEAN* Limerick Contest"; the star of which should be your favorite tank.  So break out your best rhymes.  We are going to split things into two different categories; a written category and a video category. Try to keep it short and sweet, but feel free to get as creative as you like if you decide to submit a video.

We're sure you'll have us laughing and groaning with all the entries this time around. Best of luck to you all, and may the best limericist win!

Keep in mind that all entries for this contest must adhere to the normal World of Tanks Game Rules

Here is an example of a clean limerick

“There once a Hellcat on Cliffs,  whose opponents were to totally miffed. It fired its shell, and the enemies fell, and the ending to the battle was swift.”  

How to Enter

So what do you need to do?  Submit your written limerick to  Please put Clean Limerick Contest as the subject line of your email. If you are submitting a video entry please post a link to you reciting your *CLEAN* limerick video in the forum thread here. Be sure you submit your entries before the deadline of 23:59 PST on March 24, 2013.

A Bit of Knowledge

It turns out, looking deeper into limericks, the US Army mentions them in their Dining-In and Dining-Out Handbook:


a. In certain messes, the tradition of chiding or poking good-natured fun at fellow members of the mess through limericks and ditties is practiced. This is a form of self-generated entertainment during the dinner hour and serves to enhance camaraderie and unit or section esprit while remembering the formality of the occasion. The procedure normally followed by a member who wishes to propose a limerick is to first receive permission by Mr. Vice, then present the limerick to the assembled mess. If the humor of the limerick or ditty is not readily apparent to all members and guests of the mess, a brief explanation should be offered so all present can share in the wit. The group or person referenced in the limerick is bound by honor to refute the remark prior to the close of the dinner hour, least all present believe the remark to be true.

b. An example of a limerick to a recruiting station that lost a sporting challenge to another station might be, “Your ability to shoot baskets is worse than someone in a casket."

c. Limericks or ditties can be posed by a member of the mess to another regardless of rank. Items of personal or unit sensitivity, those which might cause embarrassment, and, of course, those detrimental to the junior’s career are never proposed. It is imperative all members of the mess remember the formality of the evening and the purpose behind limericks. Personal vendettas, attacks upon notable or sacred institutions, politics, and matters of the heart are never in good taste. Remember, a limerick should be witty to all, elicit a response from the“attackee,” be in good fun and taste, and not cause the proposer or recipient undue embarrassment.

Prizes for Both Categories

  • 1st Place: 10,000
  • 2nd Place: 8,000
  • 3rd Place: 6,000
  • 4th Place: 4,000
  • 5th Place: 2,000